This photographer has a clear, well-developed style, with many elements of humour and an unusual slant on the world around him. Abusdal’s way of taking photographs is intriguing and “outside the box”; his works capture viewers’ attention immediately, but upon closer examination, all of them have stories to tell.

He captures moments in an unexpected way, using a strong and clear voice that makes us feel that he has a great deal on his mind and would like to tell stories in his own way.  The editorial board has great faith in his project, and we are of the opinion that it is precisely this style that can tell us a story that we have not seen before. Abusdal is a photographer who is not afraid to breach conventions with a view to composition, narrative technique and style. He follows his own path, and aims his camera at locations and events that many would fail to notice.

Excerpt from the project description

The Long Islands

In the Bunn Fjord, the innermost arm of the Oslo Fjord, we find the Long Islands. Despite covering an area of no more than 0.3 km2 and their history as the capital city’s old garbage dump, the archipelago has become a popular recreation and swimming area. When farmers are getting ready for spring planting and the Oslo ferries start their summer schedule, the first temporary huts pop up along the shore, in the woods and islets on the Long Islands. Small communities take shape, and the many camping areas develop their own identities. Two summers ago, I started to spend nights on the island on a regular basis at the same time as I began to take pictures of the everyday lives of those who live there. The mix is eclectic, and includes substance abusers, people with disabilities, job-seekers from southern Europe and refugees. My project involves exploring these tiny, temporary communities that arise on the Long Islands every year. I will examine the bonds that are formed when people have lived together so closely for a lengthy period of time, and I will document their camaraderie.